Posts Tagged ‘josh martin’

About Echosmith

EchosmithEchosmith is an American indie-pop band formed in February 2009 in Southern California. The band is composed of four siblings ranging from 14 to 20 years old: Graham, Sydney, Noah, and Jamie Sierota. Formerly known as Ready, Set, Go!, the band officially changed its name to Echosmith after being signed by Warner Bros. Records in May 2012. Their first single, “Tonight We’re Making History,” was released June 5, 2012 and was featured in a NBC promo for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Echosmith unveiled their new single and official music video “Come Together” in early June 2013. The band is currently recording their debut album.

The Sierota siblings were raised in Los Angeles. The three brothers and one sister grew up in a musical household playing multiple instruments throughout their childhood. The band says that a range of rock artists including Coldplay, The Smiths, U2, Joy Division, and Fleetwood Mac influenced them while growing up and encouraged them to make music together. Echosmith’s youngest member, Graham, is now 14 years old and plays drums. The only female member of the group, Sydney, is 16 years old and is the lead vocalist for the band, often contributing on guitar. The second oldest member, Noah, is 17 years old, singing and playing bass for the band. The oldest member is Jamie at 20 years old, who sings and plays guitar.

Click here if you are interested in a signed Echosmith CD or a signed Echosmith T-shirt and CD

About Pacific Dub

pacific-dubComing from Surf City USA, Pacific Dub (or PDub) is one of the youngest and newest bands within the Reggae-Rock scene. Combining catchy choruses, heavy rock n’ roll guitar melodies, and smooth hip-hop and reggae rhythms that add to PDub’s coastal vibe, Pacific Dub released 2 EP’s and 2 Full Length studio albums since early 2009. Their most recent, Tightrope, debuted #1 on iTunes Reggae Charts and allowed the group to headline their first national tour. PDub performed 83 shows in over 30 states in 2012, supporting many national acts, including- Matisyahu, Dirty Heads, Collie Buddz, Pepper, and Tomorrows Bad Seeds.

In 2013, PDub started the year by headlining and selling out the world famous Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. Starting January 25th, the band will hit the road again, visi

ting 11 states on the Winter Heatseekers Tour in support of Iration. Following Winter Tour, PDub will have 9 days off before hitting the road again on the 40 date, national, Life’s A Beach Spring Tour in support of The Expendables. Summer 2013 will include a nationwide run on the Warped Tour as well as a full US tour.

Compiled By:
Josh Martin
Sources:
Wikipedia
Echosmith.com
VanswarpedTour.com

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Ingredients:
2lbs Ground beef
3/4 cup Parmesan cheese
3 eggs
1 cup breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon salt or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning
4 tablespoons colgin Liquid Smoke
5 tablespoons Lea & Perkins Worcestershire sauce
2 Packages of hamburger buns
1 Package of Velveeta cheese or thinly sliced cheddar cheese (optional)
2-3 Tomatoes (optional)
1-2 large white onions (optional)

Directions:

1) Combine ground beef, eggs, parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs, Garlic powder, salt (or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning), Worcestershire sauce, and liquid smoke in a large mixing bowl.

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2) Mix ingredients, by hand; until all of the are ingredients mixed evenly.

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3) Form the meat into 3-4″ patties, by slapping it between your hands.

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4) Once all of your patties are made. Place them closely on to a grill or frying pan, on medium heat. Make sure to flip your patties often and try to lift them with the grill marks grain.

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5) Once the patties show grill marks, are golden brown, and have no more pink meat in the center; you are ready to serve up!
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6) Server with you favorite toppings and Barbecue sides. Personally I like corn on the cob with cold pasta salad as my sides.
20130601-181923.jpgBy: Josh Martin


Video Produced By: Jeremiah Warren

APRIL FOOLS: Tweets Will Shrink To 133 Characters

April 01, 2012 7:59 AM
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Happy April Fools’ Day!

Rest easy, that headline was just a joke. You still have 140 characters to compose a tweet. Believe it or not: The productivity of the newsroom took a hit to come up with that fake headline. A whole host of people across NPR contributed a bunch of ideas. These were our 20 runners-up:

— NPR Blogger Wins Mega-Millions Jackpot

— Ford: All New Cars Will Have Air Bags For Cats and Dogs

— Citing Safety Risks, 30 States Outlaw ‘Driveway Moments’

— More Teens ‘Going Amish,’ Shunning Technology

— Facebook Adds ‘Meh’ Button

— Facebook App Lets Friends See Your Tax Returns

— Biden Out, Boehner In As Obama Shuffles Team

— House, Senate, White House Agree On Budget

— How Your Brain Is Like A Turkish Bath House

— Limbaugh, Olbermann Plan ‘Unity Tour’

— Scientists: Pink Slime Is Really Chartreuse

— Lady Gaga To Open Olympic Ceremonies With 20 Singing Kittens

— Penguin Brawls Reported From Shrinking North Pole

— Six Surefire Ways To Lose Weight Without Exercising Or Eating Right

— Internet Goes Down. Experts Advise: Reboot

— CPB Paid Clooney, Others For ‘I Love NPR’ Endorsements

— Men Of NPR: The Calendar

— Five Reasons Pink Slime Is Good For You

— NPR Listeners Demand: No More Stamberg Cranberries. Ever.

— R. Kelly Commissioned To Write New ATC Theme

At NPR, running a hoax story on April 1 is a long tradition. Back in 1992, Talk of the Nation ran a segment in which Richard Nixon — played by Rich Little — announced he was running for president using the campaign slogan, “I didn’t do anything wrong, and I won’t do it again.”

Snap Judgment, a public radio show distributed through NPR and PRX, is also celebrating the holiday with a special edition, “Original Prankster,” described as “amazing stories about people who take the joke waaaaaay too far …”

One of our favorite hoax stories came in 2009, when All Things Considered reported from Belleville, Illinois where “the nation’s first farm-raised whales are being grown and harvested.”

Last year, All Things Considered reported on the “slow net wave,” a movement of people who savored slow, dial-up Internet.

Update at 12:23 p.m. ET: Weekend Edition Sunday’s April Fool’s Story:

You can read the show’s story on Beethoven’s 10th Symphony here.

If you’re hungering for more April Foolery The Museum of Hoaxes has a “Top 100” list.

Update at 4:18 p.m. ET: Getting Your Kid Into The Right School Just Got Harder:

Weekends on All Things Considered is weighing in with their own entirely plausible tale.

Meanwhile, here are a few more media pranks we’ve found from across the sea:

Amnesty for hosepipe owners as drought bites
From The Independent On Sunday in Britain: “People living in areas where the ban comes into force on Thursday are to be given the opportunity to surrender garden hoses at local police stations.”

Arsenal launches new fragrance that smells of Emirates Stadium
From The Sun in Britain: “The £23 perfume includes a whiff of oils in the players’ massage area, the fresh-cut pitch and leather from boss Arsene Wenger’s dugout seat”

A fine BROmance… Simon Cowell and David Walliams fool around in the park
Photos from the Mirror in Britain: “The boys found a ­secluded spot to lay out their rug, uncork their wine and enjoy a natter”

And finally, one from the BBC, curiously unavailable on their site anymore, says the Gothamist:

The Earth has exploded, killing everyone

Source: NPR.org

Compiled By: Josh Martin


Video Produced By: History Channel

Easter Bunny

temp2The Easter Bunny or Easter Rabbit is a character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holiday. It was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Frankenau’s De ovis paschalibus (About Easter Eggs) in 1682 referring to an Alsace tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs.

Rabbits and hares

The hare was a popular motif in medieval church art. In ancient times it was widely believed (as by Pliny, Plutarch, Philostratus and Aelian) that the hare was a hermaphrodite. The idea that a hare could reproduce without loss of virginity led to an association with the Virgin Mary, with hares sometimes occurring in illuminated manuscripts and Northern European paintings of the Virgin and Christ Child. It may also have been associated with the Holy Trinity, as in the three hares motif,representing the “One in Three and Three in One” of which the triangle or three interlocking shapes such as rings are common symbols. In England, this motif usually appears in a prominent place in the church, such as the central rib of the chancel roof, or on a central rib of the nave. This suggests that the symbol held significance to the church, and casts doubt on the theory that they may have been masons’ or carpenters’ signature marks.

Eggs, like rabbits and hares, are fertility symbols of antiquity. Since birds lay eggs and rabbits and hares give birth to large litters in the early spring, these became symbols of the rising fertility of the earth at the March Equinox.
Rabbits and hares are both prolific breeders. Female hares can conceive a second litter of offspring while still pregnant with the first. This phenomenon is known as superfetation. Lagomorphs mature sexually at an early age and can give birth to several litters a year (hence the saying, “to breed like bunnies”). It is therefore not surprising that rabbits and hares should become fertility symbols, or that their springtime mating antics should enter into Easter folklore.

Eggs

The precise origin of the ancient custom of decorating eggs is not known, although evidently the blooming of many flowers in spring coincides with the use of the fertility symbol of eggs—and eggs boiled with some flowers change their color, bringing the spring into the homes. Many Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church to this day typically dye their Easter eggs red, the color of blood, in recognition of the blood of the sacrificed Christ (and, of the renewal of life in springtime). Some also use the color green, in honor of the new foliage emerging after the long dead time of winter.

German Protestants wanted to retain the Catholic custom of eating colored eggs for Easter, but did not want to introduce their children to the Catholic rite of fasting. Eggs were forbidden to Catholics during the fast of Lent, which was the reason for the abundance of eggs at Easter time.

The idea of an egg-laying bunny came to the U.S. in the 18th century. German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the “Osterhase” (sometimes spelled “Oschter Haws“).Hase” means “hare”, not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the “Easter Bunny” indeed is a hare, not a rabbit. According to the legend, only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and bonnets before Easter.In 1835, Jakob Grimm wrote of long-standing similar myths in Germany itself. Grimm suggested that these derived from legends of the reconstructed continental Germanic goddess *Ostara

Theological significance

temp2The New Testament teaches that the resurrection of Jesus, which Easter celebrates, is a foundation of the Christian faith. The resurrection established Jesus as the powerful Son of God and is cited as proof that God will judge the world in righteousness. God has given Christians “a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”. Christians, through faith in the working of God are spiritually resurrected with Jesus so that they may walk in a new way of life.

Easter is linked to the Passover and Exodus from Egypt recorded in the Old Testament through the Last Supper and crucifixion that preceded the resurrection.According to the New Testament, Jesus gave the Passover meal a new meaning, as he prepared himself and his disciples for his death in the upper room during the Last Supper.He identified the matzah and cup of wine as his body soon to be sacrificed and his blood soon to be shed. Paul states, “Get rid of the old yeast that you may be a new batch without yeast—as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed”;this refers to the Passover requirement to have no yeast in the house and to the allegory of Jesus as the Paschal lamb.

One interpretation of the Gospel of John is that Jesus, as the Passover lamb, was crucified at roughly the same time as the Passover lambs were being slain in the temple, on the afternoon of Nisan 14. The scriptural instructions specify that the lamb is to be slain “between the two evenings”, that is, at twilight. By the Roman period, however, the sacrifices were performed in the mid-afternoon. Josephus, Jewish War 6.10.1/423 (“They sacrifice from the ninth to the eleventh hour”). Philo, Special Laws 2.27/145 (“Many myriads of victims from noon till eventide are offered by the whole people”). This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with the chronology in the Synoptic Gospels. It assumes that text literally translated “the preparation of the passover” in John 19:14 refers to Nisan 14 (Preparation Day for the Passover) and not necessarily to Yom Shishi (Friday, Preparation Day for Sabbath) and that the priests’ desire to be ritually pure in order to “eat the passover” refers to eating the Passover lamb, not to the public offerings made during the days of Unleavened Bread.

In the Early Church

temp2The first Christians, Jewish and Gentile, were certainly aware of the Hebrew calendar, but there is no direct evidence that they celebrated any specifically Christian annual festivals.Christians of Jewish origin were the first to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. Since the date of the resurrection was close the timing of Passover, they likely celebrated the resurrection as a new facet of the Passover festival.

Direct evidence for the Easter festival begins to appear in the mid-second century. Perhaps the earliest extant primary source referencing Easter is a mid-second-century Paschal homily attributed to Melito of Sardis, which characterizes the celebration as a well-established one. Evidence for another kind of annual Christian festival, the commemoration of martyrs, begins to appear at about the same time as evidence for the celebration of Easter. But while martyrs’ days (usually the individual dates of martyrdom) were celebrated on fixed dates in the local solar calendar, the date of Easter was fixed by means of the local Jewish lunisolar calendar. This is consistent with the celebration of Easter having entered Christianity during its earliest, Jewish period, but does not leave the question free of doubt.

The ecclesiastical historian Socrates Scholasticus attributes the observance of Easter by the church to the perpetuation of its custom, “just as many other customs have been established,” stating that neither Jesus nor his Apostles enjoined the keeping of this or any other festival. Although he describes the details of the Easter celebration as deriving from local custom, he insists the feast itself is universally observed.
Source: Wikipedia

The White House Easter Egg Roll

temp2Since 1878, American presidents and their families have celebrated Easter Monday by hosting an ‘egg roll’ party. Held on the South Lawn, it is one of the oldest annual events in White House history. Some historians note that First Lady Dolley Madison originally suggested the idea of a public egg roll, while others tell stories of informal egg-rolling parties at the White House dating back to President Lincoln’s administration. Beginning in the 1870s, Washingtonians from all social levels celebrated Easter Monday on the west grounds of the U.S. Capitol. Children rolled brilliantly dyed hard-boiled eggs down the terraced lawn.

Soon a concern for the landscape led to a bill that banned the rolling of eggs on Capitol grounds. In 1876, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the bill into law. The new edict went unchallenged in 1877, as rain cancelled all the day’s activities, but egg rollers who came in 1878 were ejected by Capitol Hill police.
Source: White House.org

Compiled By: Josh Martin

We have all heard of or seen those FaceBook posts that claim wild uses for WD-40. Although it’s true that it has over 2000 uses, don’t believe every thing you hear. I decided to look into some of the fun facts and “WD-40 sanctioned” uses. Below is an article from WD-40 addressing just this issue, enjoy:

WD-40-bait.jpg

What a Fish story!

Myth: WD-40 contains fish oil.
Fact: Consumers have told us over the years that they have caught some of the biggest fish ever after protecting their fish hooks and lures with WD-40. We believe this legend came from folks assuming that the product must contain fish oil since it appears to attract fish. Sorry Charlie®, it just ain’t so.

WD-40 Company has taken steps to respect and conserve the environment, and encourages its users to do the same. While WD-40 can be used to help protect fishing equipment from rust and corrosion, WD-40 Company does not recommend using WD-40 to attract fish.

tin-man.jpg

“WD-40 Cures Arthritis!” No Way.

Myth: WD-40 cures arthritis.
Fact: This popular headline, appearing at least once a year in the tabloids, is completely FALSE. WD-40 Company does not recommend the use of WD-40 for medical purposes, and knows no reason why WD-40 would be effective for arthritis pain relief. WD-40 contains petroleum distillates and should be handled with the same precautions for any product containing this type of material.

mad-science.jpg

WD-40’s “Secret Sauce.”

Sorry folks, it appears that the 50+-year-old formulation of WD-40 remains a secret today. Any information that you may encounter alleging the disclosure of the “secret sauce” is inaccurate.

One thing we must do is correct any misinformation that may be harmful to either our consumers or our good name. Specifically, the listing of incorrect and poorly defined ingredients and safety information.

WD-40 and Bike’s

wd-40-bike.jpgMyth: WD-40 Multi-Use Product should not be used on bike chains.
Fact:
While WD-40 Multi-Use Product it is not a grease, it is formulated with strong lubricating oils and other ingredients, and is a terrific product to use for bike maintenance. It does not attract dirt or moisture to metal surfaces – just be sure to wipe off any excess WD-40 Multi-Use Product before riding.

For long-term lubrication and other specialized bicycle maintenance needs, check out WD-40® BIKE. Developed specifically for cyclists and mechanics, this high-performance line of bicycle care products is sure to become a mainstay in the toolboxes of bike mechanics for decades.

oil-barel.jpg

It’s Not Lube?

Myth: WD-40 Multi-Use Product is not really a lubricant.
Fact:
While the “W-D” in WD-40 stands for Water Displacement, WD-40 Multi-Use Product is a unique, special blend of lubricants. The product’s formulation also contains anti-corrosion agents and ingredients for penetration, water displacement and soil removal.

It’s Mineral Spirits?

Myth: WD-40 contains Stoddard Solvent.20130320-154041.jpg
Fact:
Over the past few decades, the name Stoddard Solvent was synonymous with all mineral spirits. Today, the mineral spirits found in products like ours are more refined and processed (see hydrogenation, hydrotreating and distillation techniques) providing mixtures with varying boiling points, cleaning ability, and chemical composition.

The catchall phrase “Stoddard Solvent” is no longer adequate to tell the proper story. WD-40 does indeed have 50% mineral spirits, but they are refined and purified for specific characteristics needed to meet today’s performance, regulatory, and safety requirements.

Fun Facts About WD-40facts

1) A bus driver in Asia used WD-40 to remove a python, which had coiled itself around the undercarriage of his bus.

2) Police officers used WD-40 to remove a naked burglar trapped in an air conditioning vent.

3) Crayola Stain Removal Tips recommends using WD-40 to remove (regular) crayon marks from a variety of surfaces.

4) The WD-40 Book, featuring many user testimonials and the wacky humor of Jim & Tim, The Duct Tape GuysTM, was published in 1997. The familiar blue and yellow can has been featured in other books ranging from The Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness (General Publishing 1997) and Polish Your Furniture With Pantyhose (Hyperion 1995) to WD-40 for the Soul: A Guide To Mending Everything

5) Leslie Nielsen portrayed agent Dick Steele (a.k.a., Agent WD-40) in the 1996 movie Spy Hard.

As The Duct Tape Guys say, “You only need two tools in life, Duct Tape and WD-40. If it’s not stuck and it’s supposed to be, Duct Tape it. If it’s stuck and it’s not supposed to be, WD-40 it.”
So, keep using your WD-40. You can find a list of over 2,000 uses from our loyal users here. If you find a new use, please let us know. And, if you really need the secret formula, you can find it……written on a single notepad……locked in a vault……somewhere in California……if you can get in.

Health and Safety

Information derived from our Material Safety Data Sheet and referred to for the general use of our product can be misleading. MSDS information is for the workplace and not primarily intended for the general consumer. For the general consumer, the product label provides the key safety and usage information.

Source: WD40.com
Compiled By: Josh Martin

St. Patrick’s Day in the United States:

temp2
St. Patrick’s Day, although not a legal holiday anywhere in the United States, is nonetheless widely recognised and celebrated throughout the country. It is primarily observed as a celebration of Irish and Irish American culture; celebrations include prominent displays of the colour green, feasting, copious consumption of alcohol, religious observances, and numerous parades. The holiday has been celebrated on the North American continent since the late eighteenth century.

Saint Patrick Himself:

20130311-090303.jpg Little is known of Patrick’s early life, though it is known that he was born in Roman Britain in the fourth century, into a wealthy Romano-British family. His father was a deacon and his grandfather was a priest in the Christian church. At the age of sixteen, he was kidnapped by Irish raiders and taken captive to Ireland as a slave. It is believed he was held somewhere on the west coast of Ireland, possibly Mayo, but the exact location is unknown. According to his Confession, he was told by God in a dream to flee from captivity to the coast, where he would board a ship and return to Britain. Upon returning, he quickly joined the Church in Auxerre in Gaul and studied to be a priest.

In 432, he again said that he was called back to Ireland, though as a bishop, to Christianise the Irish from their native polytheism. Irish folklore tells that one of his teaching methods included using the shamrock to explain the Christian doctrine of the Trinity to the Irish people. After nearly thirty years of evangelism, he died on 17 March 461, and according to tradition, was buried at Downpatrick. Although there were other more successful missions to Ireland from Rome, Patrick endured as the principal champion of Irish Christianity and is held in esteem in the Irish church.

Wearing of the green:

denver-st-patricksOriginally, the colour associated with Saint Patrick was blue. Over the years the colour green and its association with Saint Patrick’s Day grew. Green ribbons and shamrocks were worn in celebration of St Patrick’s Day as early as the 17th century. Saint Patrick is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish, and the wearing and display of shamrocks and shamrock-inspired designs have become a ubiquitous feature of the day. In the 1798 rebellion, to make a political statement, Irish soldiers wore full green uniforms on 17 March in hopes of catching public attention. The phrase “the wearing of the green”, meaning to wear a shamrock on one’s clothing, derives from a song of the same name.

The first festival:

temp3The first Saint Patrick’s Festival was held on 17 March 1996. In 1997, it became a three-day event, and by 2000 it was a four-day event. By 2006, the festival was five days long; more than 675,000 people attended the 2009 parade. Overall 2009’s five-day festival saw close to 1 million visitors, who took part in festivities that included concerts, outdoor theatre performances, and fireworks. Skyfest forms the centrepiece of the festival.

The topic of the 2004 St. Patrick’s Symposium was “Talking Irish”, during which the nature of Irish identity, economic success, and the future were discussed. Since 1996, there has been a greater emphasis on celebrating and projecting a fluid and inclusive notion of “Irishness” rather than an identity based around traditional religious or ethnic allegiance. The week around Saint Patrick’s Day usually involves Irish language speakers using more Irish during Seachtain na Gaeilge (“Irish Language Week”).

As well as Dublin, many other cities, towns, and villages in Ireland hold their own parades and festivals, including Cork, Belfast, Derry, Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick, and Waterford.
The biggest celebrations outside Dublin are in Downpatrick, County Down, where Saint Patrick is rumoured to be buried. In 2004, according to Down District Council, the week-long St. Patrick’s Festival had more than 2,000 participants and 82 floats, bands, and performers and was watched by more than 30,000 people.

Christian leaders in Ireland have expressed concern about the secularisation of St Patrick’s Day. In The Word magazine’s March 2007 issue, Fr. Vincent Twomey wrote, “It is time to reclaim St Patrick’s Day as a church festival.” He questioned the need for “mindless alcohol-fuelled revelry” and concluded that “it is time to bring the piety and the fun together.”
United States

Source: Wikipedia
Compiled By: Josh Martin

St. Patrick’s Day in the United States:

temp2
St. Patrick’s Day, although not a legal holiday anywhere in the United States, is nonetheless widely recognised and celebrated throughout the country. It is primarily observed as a celebration of Irish and Irish American culture; celebrations include prominent displays of the colour green, feasting, copious consumption of alcohol, religious observances, and numerous parades. The holiday has been celebrated on the North American continent since the late eighteenth century.

Saint Patrick Himself:

20130311-090303.jpg Little is known of Patrick’s early life, though it is known that he was born in Roman Britain in the fourth century, into a wealthy Romano-British family. His father was a deacon and his grandfather was a priest in the Christian church. At the age of sixteen, he was kidnapped by Irish raiders and taken captive to Ireland as a slave. It is believed he was held somewhere on the west coast of Ireland, possibly Mayo, but the exact location is unknown. According to his Confession, he was told by God in a dream to flee from captivity to the coast, where he would board a ship and return to Britain. Upon returning, he quickly joined the Church in Auxerre in Gaul and studied to be a priest.

In 432, he again said that he was called back to Ireland, though as a bishop, to Christianise the Irish from their native polytheism. Irish folklore tells that one of his teaching methods included using the shamrock to explain the Christian doctrine of the Trinity to the Irish people. After nearly thirty years of evangelism, he died on 17 March 461, and according to tradition, was buried at Downpatrick. Although there were other more successful missions to Ireland from Rome, Patrick endured as the principal champion of Irish Christianity and is held in esteem in the Irish church.

Wearing of the green:

denver-st-patricksOriginally, the colour associated with Saint Patrick was blue. Over the years the colour green and its association with Saint Patrick’s Day grew. Green ribbons and shamrocks were worn in celebration of St Patrick’s Day as early as the 17th century. Saint Patrick is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish, and the wearing and display of shamrocks and shamrock-inspired designs have become a ubiquitous feature of the day. In the 1798 rebellion, to make a political statement, Irish soldiers wore full green uniforms on 17 March in hopes of catching public attention. The phrase “the wearing of the green”, meaning to wear a shamrock on one’s clothing, derives from a song of the same name.

The first festival:

temp3The first Saint Patrick’s Festival was held on 17 March 1996. In 1997, it became a three-day event, and by 2000 it was a four-day event. By 2006, the festival was five days long; more than 675,000 people attended the 2009 parade. Overall 2009’s five-day festival saw close to 1 million visitors, who took part in festivities that included concerts, outdoor theatre performances, and fireworks. Skyfest forms the centrepiece of the festival.

The topic of the 2004 St. Patrick’s Symposium was “Talking Irish”, during which the nature of Irish identity, economic success, and the future were discussed. Since 1996, there has been a greater emphasis on celebrating and projecting a fluid and inclusive notion of “Irishness” rather than an identity based around traditional religious or ethnic allegiance. The week around Saint Patrick’s Day usually involves Irish language speakers using more Irish during Seachtain na Gaeilge (“Irish Language Week”).

As well as Dublin, many other cities, towns, and villages in Ireland hold their own parades and festivals, including Cork, Belfast, Derry, Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick, and Waterford.
The biggest celebrations outside Dublin are in Downpatrick, County Down, where Saint Patrick is rumoured to be buried. In 2004, according to Down District Council, the week-long St. Patrick’s Festival had more than 2,000 participants and 82 floats, bands, and performers and was watched by more than 30,000 people.

Christian leaders in Ireland have expressed concern about the secularisation of St Patrick’s Day. In The Word magazine’s March 2007 issue, Fr. Vincent Twomey wrote, “It is time to reclaim St Patrick’s Day as a church festival.” He questioned the need for “mindless alcohol-fuelled revelry” and concluded that “it is time to bring the piety and the fun together.”
United States

Source: Wikipedia
Compiled By: Josh Martin

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Kia Motors America Unveils New 2014 Sorento CUV at the Los Angeles International Auto Show

Kia’s Popular U.S.-Built[1] Crossover Returns with an All-New Platform, Sophisticated New Styling Cues and Significant Improvements To Ride, Handling and Comfort

– Over 80 percent of the parts in the 2014 Sorento are either all-new or significantly redesigned, including a new 3.3-liter GDI V6 engine delivers 290 horsepower

– New Sorento will be the first Kia vehicle to offer the company’s next-generation UVO eServices voice-activated telematics system

PR Newswire

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 28, 2012

2013 kia sorentoLOS ANGELES, Nov. 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Kia Motors America (KMA) today unveiled a significantly redesigned version of its popular Sorento CUV at the Los Angeles International Auto Show. Just three years after U.S. production of the CUV began in West Point, Georgia, the 2014 Sorento comes to market as no mere refresh or facelift, boasting instead an all-new chassis, a new Gasoline Direct Injected (GDI) V6 engine, a substantially redesigned interior and a next-generation infotainment system. Expected to arrive in showrooms during the first quarter of 2013, the redesigned Sorento also adds a top-of-the-line trim level to its lineup – the SX Limited – which delivers an impressive roster of premium features and amenities.

“With each new vehicle launch Kia is advancing the concept of value to new levels of sophistication and with significant chassis, suspension, powertrain and comfort and convenience upgrades the new Sorento continues that trend,” said Michael Sprague, executive vice president, marketing and communications, KMA. “With more than 80 percent of the 2014 Sorento including new or significantly redesigned parts, it’s obvious that the improvements are not just skin deep; including technological enhancements such as UVO eServices, the next generation of our voice activated telematics system, and Kia’s first-ever blind spot detection system. [2]”

Fundamental Changes Improve Performance, Ride and Handling

If the engine is to be considered the heart of any vehicle, it’s safe to assume the new 2014 Sorento has a powerful ticker beneath its sculpted hood. New this year, the all-aluminum 3.3-liter GDI V6 produces a smooth 290 horsepower at 6,400 rpm and a stout 252 lb.-ft. of torque at 5,200 rpm. It’s available optionally on the LX and EX, while residing as standard equipment in the LX V6, EX V6, SX and SX Limited. Power is routed to either the front wheels or, optionally, to all four using an enhanced Torque On Demand all-wheel drive system that seamlessly directs power to the tire with the most traction and now includes the benefit of Torque Vectoring Cornering Control (TVCC) that aids stability under certain driving conditions.

The 2.4-liter GDI four-cylinder engine returns, now as standard equipment in the LX and EX, and replaces the previously-standard 2.4-liter MPI 4-cylinder. With 191 horsepower at 6,300 rpm and 181 lb.-ft. of torque on-hand at a low 4,250 rpm, the lightweight all-aluminum powerplant is efficient while still providing enough grunt to perform yeoman’s duty day in and day out.

Regardless of engine or driveline choice, the Sorento comes standard with a smooth shifting six-speed automatic transmission. Also standard in the new 2014 Sorento, Electric Motor Driven Power Steering replaces the hydraulic unit from the 2013 model, which improves steering feel and reduces weight to aid efficiency. New available FlexSteer offers drivers a choice of three steering modes: Comfort, Normal and Sport.

Just three years into its product lifecycle, Kia’s engineers saw fit to bring the new 2014 Sorento to market on an all-new chassis that increases torsional rigidity by 18-percent. A major focal point in designing the new chassis was to improve ride and handling. Within the engine bay, a strut-tower brace increases chassis stiffness and provides a solid platform for the new independent front suspension that incorporates a stiffer H-shaped sub-frame cradle which offers improved vehicle tracking. Around back, a reinforced multi-link setup utilizes new bushings and mounts to better isolate road noise vibration, while its compact design allows for more interior space.

Sophisticated Design, Inside and Out

In a segment more often known for bland utility, the new 2014 Sorento sports dynamic and sophisticated design elements, inside and out. Redesigned front and rear fascias enhance the Sorento’s road presence with a lower, broader appearance up front and a visually wider stance at the rear. The ubiquitous Kia tiger-nose grille is enhanced with an anodized silver metal or black mesh appearance and the lower valance has been opened to expose an aggressive cross-hatched maw. Front LED positioning lamps create dramatic eyebrows while projector style headlights peer from behind tapered clear lenses. Available fog lights on all trim models have been upended and pushed to the far corners of the front bumper for better forward and side visibility. Horizontally positioned rear LED combination lamps embrace the turn signal and back-up lights, emitting a warm corona that makes the 2014 Sorento instantly recognizable from behind. The new Sorento rides on redesigned 17-, 18- and, a first for Kia’s best-selling CUV, larger 19-inch wheels.

To step inside the new 2014 Sorento is to experience a new level of sophisticated elegance. A redesigned instrument panel deftly combines technology with proven ergonomics. On EX trims and above, the large center gauge cluster features a 7-inch TFT LCD that projects a digital speedometer flanked by easy-to-read analog instruments for the tachometer, fuel level and engine temp. The TFT LCD readout also displays trip and vehicle information, along with navigation updates (optional). The center stack’s appearance and layout has been modernized and button positions have been rearranged for a more user-friendly experience. The new design also provides room for Kia’s new larger touch screen. Diagonally spanning eight inches, the optional screen integrates navigation, SiriusXM Traffic™[3] with real-time road information updates, a premium Infinity®[4] audio system, SiruisXM™ Satellite Radio[5], Bluetooth® hands-free connectivity[6], vehicle settings and UVO eServices, Kia’s next generation of infotainment and telematics. Other new available features in the 2014 Sorento include Kia’s first-ever programmable power liftgate, a redesigned panoramic sunroof with a one piece power-operated shade, integrated 2nd row sliding sunshades, available dual ventilated air-cooled front seats, a 115-volt power inverter, and illuminated door handle pockets.

Using advanced sonar sensors, the 2014 Sorento is also the first of many Kia vehicles to begin offering a blind spot detection system. The system continually monitors traffic around the Sorento and if another vehicle is detected within a set distance, audio and visual elements alert the driver to the issue.

Advancing Value to New Levels of Sophistication: Sorento SX Limited

Shortly after the arrival of the new 2014 Sorento, the Sorento SX Limited is destined for market within the second quarter of 2013. With the success of the Optima SX Limited launched earlier this year, offering a similar appearance package on the Sorento was a logical follow-up.

Offered only in Ebony Black, Snow White Pearl and Titanium Silver, the SX Limited is set apart visually from the Sorento SX by unique self-leveling Xenon HID head lights, exclusive 19-inch chrome wheels and sporty red painted brake calipers. Exclusive SXL badges adorn the exterior to complete the look.

Inside, unique and luxurious Nappa leather trimmed seats, a wood-trimmed, heated steering wheel, and heated rear seats are all standard. The exclusive soft-touch head liner and pillar accents make the Sorento SX Limited an inviting respite from the stress and strain of urban existence.

Kia’s Unprecedented Growth
Kia Motors is one of the world’s fastest moving global automotive brands; from 2009-2011 Kia launched more new vehicles in the U.S. than any other automaker, and under the guidance of chief design officer Peter Schreyer earned a reputation as an industry leader in automotive styling. Kia Motors America’s full line of fun-to-drive cars and CUVs has earned critical acclaim and dramatically increased consumer awareness, perception and consideration for the brand. In 2011, KMA recorded its 17th consecutive year of market share growth, thanks in part to the largest increase of any major brand in perceived quality[7] and the industry’s highest brand loyalty ranking[8]. Kia’s U.S.-based manufacturing facility in West Point, Georgia – KMMG – is responsible for the creation of more than 10,000 plant and supplier jobs and builds two of the company’s best-selling vehicles in the U.S. – the Sorento CUV and Optima midsize sedan*. Kia’s value and technology-laden lineup also includes the Sportage compact CUV, Soul urban passenger vehicle, Optima Hybrid, Forte compact sedan, Forte 5-door compact hatchback, Forte Koup two-door coupe, Rio and Rio 5-door sub-compacts and Sedona minivan.

About Kia Motors America
Kia Motors America is the marketing and distribution arm of Kia Motors Corporation based in Seoul, South Korea. KMA offers a complete line of vehicles through more than 755 dealers throughout the United States and serves as the “Official Automotive Partner” of the NBA and LPGA. In 2011, KMA recorded its best-ever annual sales total and became one of the fastest growing car companies in the U.S.[9] Kia is poised to continue its momentum and will continue to build the brand through design innovation, quality, value, advanced safety features and new technologies.

Information about Kia Motors America and its full vehicle line-up is available at its website – www.kia.com. For media information, including photography, visit www.kiamedia.com.

[1] The Sorento is built in the United States from U.S. and globally sourced parts.

[2] The blind spot warning system is not a substitute for proper and safe lane changing procedures. Always drive safely and use caution when changing lanes. The blind spot warning may not detect every object alongside the vehicle.

[3] Sirius services require subscriptions, sold separately after 3-month trial included with vehicle purchase/lease. Subscriptions governed by SiriusXM Customer Agreement at siriusxm.com© 2011 SiriusXM Radio Inc. Sirius, XM and all related marks and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc.

[4] Infinity is a registered trademark of Harman International Industries, Incorporated

[5] Sirius services require subscriptions, sold separately after 3-month trial included with vehicle purchase/lease. Subscriptions governed by SiriusXM Customer Agreement at siriusxm.com© 2011 SiriusXM Radio Inc. Sirius, XM and all related marks and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc.

[6] The Bluetooth® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and any use of such marks by Kia is under license. Other trademarks and tradenames are those of their respective owners. A compatible Bluetooth® wireless technology enabled cell phone is required to use Bluetooth® wireless technology.

[7] Source: Automotive Lease Guide Spring 2011 Perceived Quality Study.

[8] Source: Experian Automotive Q2 2011 market analysis.

[9] Based on 5-year cumulative growth between 12-month retail sales for periods ending October 2007 and October 2012 of all U.S. automotive brands.

* The Sorento and Optima GDI (EX Trims and certain LX Trims only) and GDI Turbo are built in the United States from U.S. and globally sourced parts.

SOURCE Kia Motors America
Compiled By: Josh Martin

20121213-122216.jpg
Ingredients:

1 large sweet potato (yam)
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon olive oil

Directions:

1) Dice sweet potato into medium sized chunks
20121213-122235.jpg
2) Place diced sweet potato into a medium sauce pan. Cover the sweet potato with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for about 15 minutes.
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3) Remove the sweet potato from the water once it is tender, but still mildly crunchy. Combine sweet potato, cinnamon, nutmeg, sugar, olive oil and water in a medium sized skillet. Stir and sauté for about 10 minutes on medium-low heat.
20121213-122251.jpg
4) Enjoy, once the sugar has caramelized into a thick black sauce and the potato is tender.20121213-122256.jpg
By: Josh Martin

How does it work?

DonorsChoose.org is an online charity that makes it easy for anyone to help students in need. Public school teachers from every corner of America post classroom project requests on our site, and you can give any amount to the project that most inspires you.

When a project reaches its funding goal, we ship the materials to the school. You’ll get photos of the project taking place, a letter from the teacher, and insight into how every dollar was spent. Give over $50 and you’ll also receive hand-written thank-yous from the students.

Is there a minimum donation?

You can give as little as $1 and get the same level of choice, transparency, and feedback that is traditionally reserved for someone who gives millions.

What happens if a project doesn’t reach its goal?

If a partially funded project expires, donors get their donations returned as account credits, which they can use to:

Choose a new project to support; Have us choose a new project for them, Send the teacher they supported a DonorsChoose.org gift card.

How do you ensure integrity?

We vet every classroom project request, purchase the materials and ship them directly to the school, provide photos of the project taking place, and supply a cost report showing how every dollar was spent.

What kinds of schools do you serve?

K-12 public and charter schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

How did DonorsChoose.org start?

Charles Best, a new social studies teacher in the Bronx, often talked with his colleagues about materials and experiences they wanted their students to have, but which they had no funding to support. He created DonorsChoose.org in 2000 so that individuals could connect directly with classrooms in need. Check out our fun timeline.

Are gifts tax-deductible?

As a 501(c)3 charity, donations are tax-deductible to the full extent of US law. Our federal tax ID # is 13-4129457.

How long does a project appear on your site?

Projects can remain on our site for up to 5 months, but teachers can set earlier deadlines if they choose.

What percent of projects are successfully funded?

70%. For more stats, see our impact page.

Does it cost money for teachers to post projects?

No, our website is completely free for teachers to use.

Can I donate the materials themselves rather than make a cash donation?

We’re not set up to handle in-kind donations, but these great organizations are.

What’s your mission?

DonorsChoose.org engages the public in public schools by giving people a simple, accountable and personal way to address educational inequity. We envision a nation where children in every community have the tools and experiences needed for an excellent education.

Source: DonorsChoose.org

Compiled by: Josh Martin