A Cacophony of Classic Cars Heads To Auction

Lambrecht Chevrolet of Pierce, Neb., was like many Midwestern, small-town dealers — owned and operated by a family, with minimal overhead and little need for advertising since most customers were neighbors. Ray and Mildred Lambrecht ran the dealership with just one employee for 50 years before closing up, and later this year the Lambrechts will sell off a trove of 500-odd vehicles they’ve held onto over the decades — including roughly 50 with less than 10 miles on their odometers. It’s less a car sale than a time capsule auction.

While many of the cars in the Lambrecht collection were customer trade-ins that were left outside to rot, the Lambrechts would occasionally take something they couldn’t sell and just put it in storage. City folk might find it unthinkable to leave so many vehicles lying around for so many years, but there’s always more space in rural Nebraska, and the annual costs fall to zero quickly. I wouldn’t call it hoarding, but I know many people who gather old metal like this do form an attachment to their kingdom of rust; every ride has a story, even when there’s weeds growing around it. Jeannie Lambrecht Stillwell, the Lambrecht’s daughter, says the decision to sell wasn’t an easy one for her parents, and that the cars “comprise a lifetime of hard work, tears, and joy.”

Fortunately for collectors, the Lambrechts preservation-through-neglect has created the type of barn finds that many search years to discover. Among the dozen low-miles pickups sits a 1956 Chevrolet Cameo pickup with an odometer reading of just over one mile, and a 1964 Chevy Impala with six miles that still has its original window sticker and the plastic sheeting that covered its red leather seats. Although even ardent Corvette fans look askance at the late ’70s models, the ’78 version here with five miles has an appeal that’s grown over time.

The rest of the 500-car list reads like an inventory of popular models from the ’50s and ’60s — Bel Airs, Corvairs and even a couple of Vegas — which the VanDerBrink Auction company is still documenting ahead of the sale in Pierce on Sept. 28-29, along with dozens of pieces of memorabilia, hubcaps and even a Corvette pedal car. You can see the auctioneer take a walk though the Lambrechts’ garage below:

Car collectors dream about finding a forgotten “new” classic car, discovered in a barn or warehouse somewhere, covered in dust. This is that dream, only 500 times better….

A small-town Midwestern dealership in Pierce, Nebraska sold Chevrolets to local families and first-time buyers for 50 years until it’s husband and wife team finally closed their doors seventeen years ago. Since then, a staggering inventory of 500 surviving cars, new & used, have been stored away, undriven for decades. Some 50 cars “brand new” Chevrolets from the 1950s and 60s have less than 10 miles on the odometer.

Ray and Mildred Lambrecht are now in their 90s and have made what is described by their daughter Jeannie, as a “a difficult and painful” decision, to liquidate the dealership’s massive inventory of ‘survivor vehicles’. On September 28th and 29th, 2013, VanDerBrink Auctions will have the honor of selling this incredible, once in a lifetime collection of American automotive history.

Up for sale? A seemingly endless list of 1950′s, 60′s Impalas, TRi-Fives, Chevelles, including a 1956 Chevrolet Cameo Pickup and a 1963 Impala with less than 10 miles on the clock.

Lambrecht Chevrolet Company opened in 1946, at a time when cars sold for around $600 to $800. It was owned and operated by Ray and Mildred Lambrecht with just one employee, a mechanic. “My parents worked six days a week for 50 years, never taking one single day of vacation or one sick day,” remembers their daughter Jeannie. “They worked hard and operated their business with honesty, integrity, and kindness, frequently lending a helping hand to others who were in need …This was a small ‘mom and pop’ operation, and it stayed that way throughout the decades in business.”

While all the new, unsold stock were stored away in the warehouses, many of the dealership’s trade-ins were parked on the family farm outside of town which gradually grew into a massive collection. “There is a lot of history in that collection,” explains Jeannie, who says her love of Chevrolets is in her DNA . “Dad can look at any of those vehicles today and tell you the story behind it. He remembers each used car and the former owner, like the 1928 Durant owned by Mom’s uncle Louie.”

“Unlike today, one special day in September of each year was the first opportunity for anyone to view the new car models for that year. New cars would be delivered in advance and then hidden away so that nobody could see them before Announcement Day. Early that morning, Dad would move one shiny new Chevrolet into the showroom. There would be balloons and banners, coffee and donuts, souvenirs, and lots of built-up excitement. Everyone in town would come to see the new car and truck models.”

“When attending gatherings of friends and family, Dad would often turn to me and loudly ask the question, ‘What is the finest car made?’ I would shout, ‘Chevrolet!!!!’, and it would bring down the house. I didn’t really know what was so funny, but I was happy to play my part.”

Find details of the auction on the VanDerBrink website.
Compiled By: Josh Martin

Labor Day: How it Came About; What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Founder of Labor Day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From them developed the movement to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

A Nationwide Holiday

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

Compiled By: Josh Martin
Sources: Department of labor

About Echosmith

EchosmithEchosmith is an American indie-pop band formed in February 2009 in Southern California. The band is composed of four siblings ranging from 14 to 20 years old: Graham, Sydney, Noah, and Jamie Sierota. Formerly known as Ready, Set, Go!, the band officially changed its name to Echosmith after being signed by Warner Bros. Records in May 2012. Their first single, “Tonight We’re Making History,” was released June 5, 2012 and was featured in a NBC promo for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Echosmith unveiled their new single and official music video “Come Together” in early June 2013. The band is currently recording their debut album.

The Sierota siblings were raised in Los Angeles. The three brothers and one sister grew up in a musical household playing multiple instruments throughout their childhood. The band says that a range of rock artists including Coldplay, The Smiths, U2, Joy Division, and Fleetwood Mac influenced them while growing up and encouraged them to make music together. Echosmith’s youngest member, Graham, is now 14 years old and plays drums. The only female member of the group, Sydney, is 16 years old and is the lead vocalist for the band, often contributing on guitar. The second oldest member, Noah, is 17 years old, singing and playing bass for the band. The oldest member is Jamie at 20 years old, who sings and plays guitar.

Click here if you are interested in a signed Echosmith CD or a signed Echosmith T-shirt and CD

About Pacific Dub

pacific-dubComing from Surf City USA, Pacific Dub (or PDub) is one of the youngest and newest bands within the Reggae-Rock scene. Combining catchy choruses, heavy rock n’ roll guitar melodies, and smooth hip-hop and reggae rhythms that add to PDub’s coastal vibe, Pacific Dub released 2 EP’s and 2 Full Length studio albums since early 2009. Their most recent, Tightrope, debuted #1 on iTunes Reggae Charts and allowed the group to headline their first national tour. PDub performed 83 shows in over 30 states in 2012, supporting many national acts, including- Matisyahu, Dirty Heads, Collie Buddz, Pepper, and Tomorrows Bad Seeds.

In 2013, PDub started the year by headlining and selling out the world famous Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. Starting January 25th, the band will hit the road again, visi

ting 11 states on the Winter Heatseekers Tour in support of Iration. Following Winter Tour, PDub will have 9 days off before hitting the road again on the 40 date, national, Life’s A Beach Spring Tour in support of The Expendables. Summer 2013 will include a nationwide run on the Warped Tour as well as a full US tour.

Compiled By:
Josh Martin


temp[Benedictine or Benedictine Spread is a condiment made with cucumbers, onions and cream cheese. It is used to make cucumber sandwiches and was invented around the turn of the 20th century by Jennie Carter Benedict, a caterer and restaurateur in Louisville, Kentucky. Benedict opened her restaurant in 1893. It was there that she invented and originally served benedictine. Originally used for sandwiches, benedictine has in recent years been used as a dip for chips and filling for potatoes.

“Louisvillians quiz guests and younger family members on the origin of Benedictine. The famous cucumber spread was, of course, created by one of our city’s most famous residents, Jennie C. Benedict. Setting the highest of culinary standards, “Miss Jennie” was also a successful businesswoman, a writer who for a time served as editor of The Courier-Journal’s Household section, and an important community volunteer.

The University Press of Kentucky has republished Jennie Benedict’s The Blue Ribbon Cook Book, from the fourth edition, 1922.” Susan Reigler, former restaurant critic and travel editor of The C-J, has written the Introduction, and for the first time the recipe for Benedictine Spread is published. The wonder is that it was never included in the other five editions, or in Benedict’s autobiography. Maybe she considered her recipe as secret as Colonel Sanders did his herbs and spices for chicken.

Reigler writes lovingly of her own youth when young ladies wore white gloves and munched cream cheese-and-nut sandwiches, based on Benedict’s concoction, in the restaurant of the old Stewart’s Dry Goods department store. She recounts the influence of recipes on today’s restaurants and home cooks as well.

A close variation of Miss Jennie’s “Stuffed Eggplant” has been on the menu of Simpsonville’s Old Stone Inn for many years. Louisville’s Kathy Cary at Lilly’s serves her own version of Benedictine, as do Chef Matt Weber at the Uptown Café, and Ouita Michel at Holly Hill Inn in Midway. Holly Hill’s sous-chef, Lisa Laufer, supplies her recipe for this book.

Reigler gives an interesting picture of the woman who, in 1893, started a catering business from her home. Benedict soon began defining Louisville’s tastes as she catered parties and weddings of its most prominent citizens and fed the middle class in her tearooms.

Miss Jennie’s menus became musts for Derby Day celebrations. Through the decades her cookbook remains popular. Reigler says, “I had many, many calls from readers trying to locate a copy. …”

The Blue Ribbon Cook Book contains a Glossary that is a cooking lesson in itself. The large sections on “Entrees” and “Desserts” are complemented by interesting advice in “Sick Room Cookery,” and practical kitchen tricks.

Probably the most intriguing recipe of all is that which keeps Miss Jennie’s name on Louisville lips. Here is the version supplied by cookbook author and former Courier-Journal food editor Ronni Lundy. It is the one that Jennie C. Benedict would most likely have included in her book:

Benedictine spread

· 8 ounces of cream cheese, softened
· 3 tablespoons cucumber juice
· 1 tablespoon onion juice
· 1 teaspoon salt
· a few grains of cayenne pepper
· 2 drops green food coloring

To get the juice, peel and grate a cucumber, then wrap in a clean dish towel and squeeze juice into a dish. Discard pulp. Do the same for the onion. Mix all ingredients with a fork until well blended. Using a blender will make the spread too runny.”

(Above) The interior of Jennie Benedict’s restaurant at 554 S. Fourth Street in downtown Louisville. The establishment opened in 1900 and was sold in 1925 for $50,000. Benedict was trained in New York by Fanny Farmer.

Weekend Edition Saturday Transcript:

temp[Cream cheese, cucumber juice and a touch of onion. That may sound like an unlikely combination, but Benedictine is a Kentucky favorite. Gwynne Potts, a self-proclaimed aficionado, says it’s delicious.

“The best thing to eat Benedictine on is just white bread,” Potts says. “No special bread; it only takes away from the Benedictine.”

Potts, who grew up in Louisville, Ky., has been enjoying the creamy combo for six decades. And for the first 18 years of her life, she says, Benedictine was like ketchup. She assumed it was eaten everywhere until, as a college student, she took a spring break trip to Florida.

“We couldn’t imagine having lunch without Benedictine,” Potts says. “We went from store to store, saying, ‘Where’s your Benedictine?’ And they just looked at us. It was the first time I realized the whole world didn’t know about Benedictine.”

Years later, that’s still pretty much the case. But this creamy, cool cucumber spread has persisted in Kentucky ever since Jennie Benedict, a famous Louisville caterer, invented it around the turn of the 20th century.

Benedict opened a tearoom on downtown Louisville’s South Fourth Street in 1911. Back then, that was the city’s bustling commercial center, packed with stores, cafes, theaters and hotels. Today, it’s a few boutiques and several wig shops.

Susan Reigler, a former restaurant critic for Louisville’s newspaper, The Courier-Journal, wrote the introduction to the re-release of Benedict’s Blue Ribbon Cook Book in 2008. Reigler says Benedict’s role in the city’s culinary history was huge and that the roots of many of the city’s flavors can be traced back to her recipes.

Of course, some of Benedict’s concoctions have fallen out of favor — like calf brains and peptonized oysters for the sick. But Reigler says Benedictine has endured.

“I think it’s just very different. It’s very refreshing. It’s a light spread,” she says. “What could be more light and delicate than cucumber juice?”

temp[One source of contention among Louisville chefs is whether to include the two drops of green food coloring that Benedict used in her recipe. The dye lets people know that it’s not just a plain cream cheese spread, but the practice is no longer popular with chefs like Kathy Cary, who prefer more natural ingredients. Cary has owned Lilly’s, a restaurant that specializes in Kentucky cuisine, for the past 25 years. For her, the dish is truly a way to showcase both local cucumbers and local traditions.

“Mine is really about … celebrating the cucumbers,” Cary says. “Obviously, no dye, no food coloring. And it’s filled with texture, and sort of the crunch of the cucumbers.”

Some cooks serve Benedictine as a dip, others as tea sandwiches with the crusts cut off. But Cary usually puts hers into a hearty sandwich with homemade mayonnaise, bacon, bibb lettuce and sprouts.

However you serve it, Benedictine is best accompanied with another Kentucky signature: bourbon.

Sources: Wikipedia, NRP.org, The Courier Journal
Compiled By: Josh Martin

Who is Kia Motors. Official Vehicle of the Vans Warped Tour:

For the sixth consecutive summer, Kia Motors America (KMA) heads back on tour to nearly 40 U.S. stops as the “Official Vehicle of the 2013 Vans Warped Tour®.” At every stop, Warped fans have the opportunity to catch live music performances from today’s biggest rock and indie bands on ttemp[he Kia Soul and Kia Forte main stages as well as participate in a variety of interactive activities and events at the Kia Soul Lounge. Along with displays of the 2014 Soul, and 2014 Forte 5-door, the Soul Lounge will feature a DJ, body painting and hair styling stations and exclusive daily autograph sessions and acoustic sessions with top tour bands We Came As Romans and Sleeping With Sirens, along with fun activities and giveaways, including a “Rock and Roll” photo booth where concertgoers ca.

n scream and rock out to their heart’s desire and a “Share Your Soul” interactive photo sharing game. Festival participants also may earn Kia VIP passes for exclusive access to a private riser near the main stage providing shade and unobstructed views of some of the biggest performances throughout the day. Visit kiawarped.com for exclusive content.

Source: VansWarpedTour.com

More About The 2013 Warped Tour

Warped Tour 2013 is the 19th annual Summer Warped Tour festival. Vans Shoes is again the tour’s primary sponsor. The tour dates were announced on October 25, 2012. Bands announcements began on December 7 at 11:00 PM during Warped Roadies on Fuse. The Warped Tour 2013 kick off party took place March 28, 2013 at Club Nokia in Los Angeles, California featuring performances by Chiodos, New Beat Fund, MC Lars, Craig Owens, Dia Frampton, Charlotte Sometimes, Big Chocolate, Echosmith and special guests. The tour will once again return to Europe for the second year in a row with more tour dates. For the first time since 2001, Warped Tour will also appear in Australia.

Kia Soul Stage

Kia Forte Stage

Source: Wikipedia
Compiled By: Josh Martin

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2lbs Ground beef
3/4 cup Parmesan cheese
3 eggs
1 cup breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon salt or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning
4 tablespoons colgin Liquid Smoke
5 tablespoons Lea & Perkins Worcestershire sauce
2 Packages of hamburger buns
1 Package of Velveeta cheese or thinly sliced cheddar cheese (optional)
2-3 Tomatoes (optional)
1-2 large white onions (optional)


1) Combine ground beef, eggs, parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs, Garlic powder, salt (or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning), Worcestershire sauce, and liquid smoke in a large mixing bowl.

2) Mix ingredients, by hand; until all of the are ingredients mixed evenly.

3) Form the meat into 3-4″ patties, by slapping it between your hands.

4) Once all of your patties are made. Place them closely on to a grill or frying pan, on medium heat. Make sure to flip your patties often and try to lift them with the grill marks grain.

5) Once the patties show grill marks, are golden brown, and have no more pink meat in the center; you are ready to serve up!
6) Server with you favorite toppings and Barbecue sides. Personally I like corn on the cob with cold pasta salad as my sides.
20130601-181923.jpgBy: Josh Martin

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Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. Many countries celebrate it on the third Sunday of June, but it is also celebrated widely on other days. Father’s Day was created to complement Mother’s Day, a celebration that honors mothers and motherhood.

Father’s Day was inaugurated in the United States in the early 20th century to complement Mother’s Day in celebrating fatherhood and male parenting.

After the success obtained by Anna Jarvis with the promotion of Mother’s Day in the US, some wanted to create similar holidays for other family members, and Father’s Day was the choice most likely to succeed. There were other persons in the US who independently thought of “Father’s Day”, but the credit for the modern holiday is often given to Sonora Dodd, who was the driving force behind its establishment.

Father’s Day was founded in Spokane, Washington at the YMCA in 1910 by Sonora Smart Dodd, who was born in Arkansas. Its first celebration was in the Spokane YMCA on June 19, 1910. Her father, the Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, was a single parent who raised his six children there. After hearing a sermon about Jarvis’ Mother’s Day in 1909, she told her pastor that fathers should have a similar holiday honoring them. Although she initially suggested June 5, her father’s birthday, the pastors did not have enough time to prepare their sermons, and the celebration was deferred to the third Sunday of June.

It did not have much success initially. In the 1920s, Dodd stopped promoting the celebration because she was studying in the Art Institute of Chicago, and it faded into relative obscurity, even in Spokane. In the 1930s Dodd returned to Spokane and started promoting the celebration again, raising awareness at a national level. She had the help of those trade groups that would benefit most from the holiday, for example the manufacturers of ties, tobacco pipes, and any traditional present to fathers. Since 1938 she had the help of the Father’s Day Council, founded by the New York Associated Men’s Wear Retailers to consolidate and systematize the commercial promotion. Americans resisted the holiday during a few decades, perceiving it as just an attempt by merchants to replicate the commercial success of Mother’s Day, and newspapers frequently featured cynical and sarcastic attacks and jokes. But the trade groups did not give up: they kept promoting it and even incorporated the jokes into their adverts, and they eventually succeeded. By the mid 1980s the Father’s Council wrote that “(…) [Father’s Day] has become a ‘Second Christmas’ for all the men’s gift-oriented industries.”

A bill to accord national recognition of the holiday was introduced in Congress in 1913. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson went to Spokane to speak in a Father’s Day celebration and wanted to make it official, but Congress resisted, fearing that it would become commercialized.US President Calvin Coolidge recommended in 1924 that the day be observed by the nation, but stopped short of issuing a national proclamation. Two earlier attempts to formally recognize the holiday had been defeated by Congress. In 1957, Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith wrote a proposal accusing Congress of ignoring fathers for 40 years while honoring mothers, thus “[singling] out just one of our two parents”. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honoring fathers, designating the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day.[14] Six years later, the day was made a permanent national holiday when President Richard Nixon signed it into law in 1972.

In addition to Father’s Day, International Men’s Day is celebrated in many countries on November 19 for men and boys who are not fathers.

Source: Wikipedia
Compiled By: Josh Martin
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Video Produced By: Kia Motors America

Kia Motors America has teamed up with leading women’s lifestyle brand POPSUGAR, Inc. to deliver a series of online episodes aimed at moms, entitled “POPSUGAR Circle of Moms, Everyday Answers.”

tia mowry fuckedThe series of eight episodes features celebrity mom and reality star Tia Mowry.

The shows will feature Tia and a group of mom bloggers trying to accomplish different family tasks whilst getting around in the all-new 2014 Kia Sorento CUV.

As they travel, the ladies talk about the issues facing parents today, whilst offering a number of great solutions.

Popular topics such as health, relationshipd, and meal planning will be discussed on the shows, which will appear every week on POPSUGAR.com.

Tia Mowry will be the one behind the wheel of the 2014 Kia Sorento CUV as she drives to such places a s the grocery store, pilates class, and the houses of other mom’s.
About the 2014 Sorento

The all-new 2014 Sorento was first seen at the Los Angeles International Auto Show. The car, which is built at the West Point, GA. plant, is not just a refresh, but is instead built on an entirely new chassis and has a Gasoline Direct Injected (GDI) V6 engine under the hood.temp

The interior also gets a whole new look, as well as a next-generation infotainment system. A new trim level, the SX Limited, has been added, and it comes with a whole host of premium features and amenities.

The revised Kia Sorento is a 7-seat crossover vehicle designed for family use, which is why it contains features such as fold-down third row seating and technological enhancements such as UVO eServices and Kia’s first-ever Blind Spot Detection System

Here is a little more information about Tia:

Tia_MowryTia Dashon Mowry-Hardrict is an American actress, singer, voice actress, and author. She first gained fame for her teen role as Tia Landry on the ABC/WB sitcom Sister, Sister. Wikipedia

Born: July 6, 1978 (age 34), Gelnhausen
Full name: Tia Dashon Mowry-Hardrict

Sources: Kia World.net, IMDB.com

Compiled By: Josh Martin
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APRIL FOOLS: Tweets Will Shrink To 133 Characters

April 01, 2012 7:59 AM
Happy April Fools’ Day!

Rest easy, that headline was just a joke. You still have 140 characters to compose a tweet. Believe it or not: The productivity of the newsroom took a hit to come up with that fake headline. A whole host of people across NPR contributed a bunch of ideas. These were our 20 runners-up:

— NPR Blogger Wins Mega-Millions Jackpot

— Ford: All New Cars Will Have Air Bags For Cats and Dogs

— Citing Safety Risks, 30 States Outlaw ‘Driveway Moments’

— More Teens ‘Going Amish,’ Shunning Technology

— Facebook Adds ‘Meh’ Button

— Facebook App Lets Friends See Your Tax Returns

— Biden Out, Boehner In As Obama Shuffles Team

— House, Senate, White House Agree On Budget

— How Your Brain Is Like A Turkish Bath House

— Limbaugh, Olbermann Plan ‘Unity Tour’

— Scientists: Pink Slime Is Really Chartreuse

— Lady Gaga To Open Olympic Ceremonies With 20 Singing Kittens

— Penguin Brawls Reported From Shrinking North Pole

— Six Surefire Ways To Lose Weight Without Exercising Or Eating Right

— Internet Goes Down. Experts Advise: Reboot

— CPB Paid Clooney, Others For ‘I Love NPR’ Endorsements

— Men Of NPR: The Calendar

— Five Reasons Pink Slime Is Good For You

— NPR Listeners Demand: No More Stamberg Cranberries. Ever.

— R. Kelly Commissioned To Write New ATC Theme

At NPR, running a hoax story on April 1 is a long tradition. Back in 1992, Talk of the Nation ran a segment in which Richard Nixon — played by Rich Little — announced he was running for president using the campaign slogan, “I didn’t do anything wrong, and I won’t do it again.”

Snap Judgment, a public radio show distributed through NPR and PRX, is also celebrating the holiday with a special edition, “Original Prankster,” described as “amazing stories about people who take the joke waaaaaay too far …”

One of our favorite hoax stories came in 2009, when All Things Considered reported from Belleville, Illinois where “the nation’s first farm-raised whales are being grown and harvested.”

Last year, All Things Considered reported on the “slow net wave,” a movement of people who savored slow, dial-up Internet.

Update at 12:23 p.m. ET: Weekend Edition Sunday’s April Fool’s Story:

You can read the show’s story on Beethoven’s 10th Symphony here.

If you’re hungering for more April Foolery The Museum of Hoaxes has a “Top 100” list.

Update at 4:18 p.m. ET: Getting Your Kid Into The Right School Just Got Harder:

Weekends on All Things Considered is weighing in with their own entirely plausible tale.

Meanwhile, here are a few more media pranks we’ve found from across the sea:

Amnesty for hosepipe owners as drought bites
From The Independent On Sunday in Britain: “People living in areas where the ban comes into force on Thursday are to be given the opportunity to surrender garden hoses at local police stations.”

Arsenal launches new fragrance that smells of Emirates Stadium
From The Sun in Britain: “The £23 perfume includes a whiff of oils in the players’ massage area, the fresh-cut pitch and leather from boss Arsene Wenger’s dugout seat”

A fine BROmance… Simon Cowell and David Walliams fool around in the park
Photos from the Mirror in Britain: “The boys found a ­secluded spot to lay out their rug, uncork their wine and enjoy a natter”

And finally, one from the BBC, curiously unavailable on their site anymore, says the Gothamist:

The Earth has exploded, killing everyone

Source: NPR.org

Compiled By: Josh Martin

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Easter Bunny

temp2The Easter Bunny or Easter Rabbit is a character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holiday. It was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Frankenau’s De ovis paschalibus (About Easter Eggs) in 1682 referring to an Alsace tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs.

Rabbits and hares

The hare was a popular motif in medieval church art. In ancient times it was widely believed (as by Pliny, Plutarch, Philostratus and Aelian) that the hare was a hermaphrodite. The idea that a hare could reproduce without loss of virginity led to an association with the Virgin Mary, with hares sometimes occurring in illuminated manuscripts and Northern European paintings of the Virgin and Christ Child. It may also have been associated with the Holy Trinity, as in the three hares motif,representing the “One in Three and Three in One” of which the triangle or three interlocking shapes such as rings are common symbols. In England, this motif usually appears in a prominent place in the church, such as the central rib of the chancel roof, or on a central rib of the nave. This suggests that the symbol held significance to the church, and casts doubt on the theory that they may have been masons’ or carpenters’ signature marks.

Eggs, like rabbits and hares, are fertility symbols of antiquity. Since birds lay eggs and rabbits and hares give birth to large litters in the early spring, these became symbols of the rising fertility of the earth at the March Equinox.
Rabbits and hares are both prolific breeders. Female hares can conceive a second litter of offspring while still pregnant with the first. This phenomenon is known as superfetation. Lagomorphs mature sexually at an early age and can give birth to several litters a year (hence the saying, “to breed like bunnies”). It is therefore not surprising that rabbits and hares should become fertility symbols, or that their springtime mating antics should enter into Easter folklore.


The precise origin of the ancient custom of decorating eggs is not known, although evidently the blooming of many flowers in spring coincides with the use of the fertility symbol of eggs—and eggs boiled with some flowers change their color, bringing the spring into the homes. Many Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church to this day typically dye their Easter eggs red, the color of blood, in recognition of the blood of the sacrificed Christ (and, of the renewal of life in springtime). Some also use the color green, in honor of the new foliage emerging after the long dead time of winter.

German Protestants wanted to retain the Catholic custom of eating colored eggs for Easter, but did not want to introduce their children to the Catholic rite of fasting. Eggs were forbidden to Catholics during the fast of Lent, which was the reason for the abundance of eggs at Easter time.

The idea of an egg-laying bunny came to the U.S. in the 18th century. German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the “Osterhase” (sometimes spelled “Oschter Haws“).Hase” means “hare”, not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the “Easter Bunny” indeed is a hare, not a rabbit. According to the legend, only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and bonnets before Easter.In 1835, Jakob Grimm wrote of long-standing similar myths in Germany itself. Grimm suggested that these derived from legends of the reconstructed continental Germanic goddess *Ostara

Theological significance

temp2The New Testament teaches that the resurrection of Jesus, which Easter celebrates, is a foundation of the Christian faith. The resurrection established Jesus as the powerful Son of God and is cited as proof that God will judge the world in righteousness. God has given Christians “a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”. Christians, through faith in the working of God are spiritually resurrected with Jesus so that they may walk in a new way of life.

Easter is linked to the Passover and Exodus from Egypt recorded in the Old Testament through the Last Supper and crucifixion that preceded the resurrection.According to the New Testament, Jesus gave the Passover meal a new meaning, as he prepared himself and his disciples for his death in the upper room during the Last Supper.He identified the matzah and cup of wine as his body soon to be sacrificed and his blood soon to be shed. Paul states, “Get rid of the old yeast that you may be a new batch without yeast—as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed”;this refers to the Passover requirement to have no yeast in the house and to the allegory of Jesus as the Paschal lamb.

One interpretation of the Gospel of John is that Jesus, as the Passover lamb, was crucified at roughly the same time as the Passover lambs were being slain in the temple, on the afternoon of Nisan 14. The scriptural instructions specify that the lamb is to be slain “between the two evenings”, that is, at twilight. By the Roman period, however, the sacrifices were performed in the mid-afternoon. Josephus, Jewish War 6.10.1/423 (“They sacrifice from the ninth to the eleventh hour”). Philo, Special Laws 2.27/145 (“Many myriads of victims from noon till eventide are offered by the whole people”). This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with the chronology in the Synoptic Gospels. It assumes that text literally translated “the preparation of the passover” in John 19:14 refers to Nisan 14 (Preparation Day for the Passover) and not necessarily to Yom Shishi (Friday, Preparation Day for Sabbath) and that the priests’ desire to be ritually pure in order to “eat the passover” refers to eating the Passover lamb, not to the public offerings made during the days of Unleavened Bread.

In the Early Church

temp2The first Christians, Jewish and Gentile, were certainly aware of the Hebrew calendar, but there is no direct evidence that they celebrated any specifically Christian annual festivals.Christians of Jewish origin were the first to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. Since the date of the resurrection was close the timing of Passover, they likely celebrated the resurrection as a new facet of the Passover festival.

Direct evidence for the Easter festival begins to appear in the mid-second century. Perhaps the earliest extant primary source referencing Easter is a mid-second-century Paschal homily attributed to Melito of Sardis, which characterizes the celebration as a well-established one. Evidence for another kind of annual Christian festival, the commemoration of martyrs, begins to appear at about the same time as evidence for the celebration of Easter. But while martyrs’ days (usually the individual dates of martyrdom) were celebrated on fixed dates in the local solar calendar, the date of Easter was fixed by means of the local Jewish lunisolar calendar. This is consistent with the celebration of Easter having entered Christianity during its earliest, Jewish period, but does not leave the question free of doubt.

The ecclesiastical historian Socrates Scholasticus attributes the observance of Easter by the church to the perpetuation of its custom, “just as many other customs have been established,” stating that neither Jesus nor his Apostles enjoined the keeping of this or any other festival. Although he describes the details of the Easter celebration as deriving from local custom, he insists the feast itself is universally observed.
Source: Wikipedia

The White House Easter Egg Roll

temp2Since 1878, American presidents and their families have celebrated Easter Monday by hosting an ‘egg roll’ party. Held on the South Lawn, it is one of the oldest annual events in White House history. Some historians note that First Lady Dolley Madison originally suggested the idea of a public egg roll, while others tell stories of informal egg-rolling parties at the White House dating back to President Lincoln’s administration. Beginning in the 1870s, Washingtonians from all social levels celebrated Easter Monday on the west grounds of the U.S. Capitol. Children rolled brilliantly dyed hard-boiled eggs down the terraced lawn.

Soon a concern for the landscape led to a bill that banned the rolling of eggs on Capitol grounds. In 1876, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the bill into law. The new edict went unchallenged in 1877, as rain cancelled all the day’s activities, but egg rollers who came in 1878 were ejected by Capitol Hill police.
Source: White House.org

Compiled By: Josh Martin